Updating our Terms of Service, Privacy Policy and Dropbox for Business Agreement

Posted by Ramsey Homsany on February 20, 2014

We’ve made a lot of changes to Dropbox since we last updated our Terms of Service, Privacy Policy, and online Dropbox for Business Agreements. So today, we’re starting to email users to let you know about some updates to these policies. The updates will be effective on March 24, 2014.

We know that these types of updates are really important to you, and we want to help you understand them. Here’s a walk-through of the major changes:

  • Arbitration. We’re adding arbitration clauses to our Terms of Service and Dropbox for Business online agreement. Arbitration is a faster and more efficient way to resolve legal disputes, and it provides a good alternative to things like state or federal courts, where the process could take months or even years. If you prefer to opt out of arbitration in the Terms of Service, there’s no need to fax us or trek to the post office — just fill out this quick online form.

  • Permissions. We care about having Terms of Service that are readable, give the right amount of context, and avoid unnecessary legalese, so we’ve updated our language to better match the permissions you give us with the features you use. For example, to provide you with document previews, our automated systems need permission to access and scan your stuff for those previews — so we explain this in the new Terms.

  • Privacy Policy. We’ve clarified several sections of our Privacy Policy to better explain how our services use your information. Take contacts, for example. When you give us access to your contacts, we’ll store them so that you — and only you — can easily share your stuff, regardless of whether you’re using Dropbox on your phone, tablet, or home computer. We’ve also added a section explaining our recently launched Government Data Request Principles, which describe our commitment to protecting your privacy when handling government requests.

  • Mailbox. It’s been almost a year since Mailbox joined the Dropbox family, and we’re finally transitioning the app to the same Terms of Service and Privacy Policy as the rest of Dropbox.

  • Dropbox for Business. We’ve made great leaps over the past year as we’ve grown and developed Dropbox for Business to help companies work smarter. Our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy updates more clearly reflect the advancements we’ve built for admins and end users.

We hope you’ll read the full Terms of Service, Privacy Policy and Business Agreement. While we’ve simplified much of the language, our commitment to keeping your stuff safe and secure hasn’t changed. We don’t sell your personal information to third parties. We don’t serve ads based on the stuff you store in our services. And, as always, your stuff is yours.

Over the next few days, we’ll be emailing all our users to ensure you hear about these updates from us.

399 Comments to Updating our Terms of Service, Privacy Policy and Dropbox for Business Agreement

dadeoralive
February 20, 2014

“Arbitration is a faster and more efficient way to resolve legal disputes, and it provides a good alternative to things like state or federal courts, where the process could take months or even years.” THIS IS COMPLETE BULLSHIT AND A LIE. DO YOU PAY FOR THE ARBITRATOR THAT WILL BE CHARGING IN EXCESS OF $350 per hour? Dropbox, thought you were better than that. I URGE ALL TO OPT OUT.

ActiusLuna
February 20, 2014

Did you miss the part where you can opt out of arbitration? It’s not mandatory.

numpty
February 20, 2014

Shush you, with your facts and all.

Yourmovecreep
February 20, 2014

Can’t even spell deadoralive. Dumb ass

Yourmovecreep
February 20, 2014

Can’t even spell deadoralive… Dumb as.

dadeoralive
February 20, 2014

No I opted out. You don’t care about bullshit and being lied to? That’s fine- get screwed. Not one fuck will be given.

dadeoralive
February 20, 2014

Is there a deadline to opt out? That fact is curiously missing. SHEEP.

Mark
February 20, 2014

Automatically opting-in on arbitration is not good. Actually, automatically opting someone in to something with legal repercussions should never be done. Instead of “opting all users in when the change is made” you should send users a concise, clear form to make a choice yes or no. If it wasn’t for seeing your tweet by chance I wouldn’t even -know- about this… If you want to provide transparency to your users, please don’t log-roll anything. Thanks :)

Sean Killeen
February 20, 2014

On one hand, I appreciate that Dropbox quickly and easily allowed me to opt out of arbitration, which I feel disenfranchises a user from accessing otherwise rightful legal options should a dispute arise.

On the other hand, opt-out arbitration causes me to lose some trust. I understand the reasoning — I mean, who would ever opt *in* to arbitration? However, nobody would ever opt-in because it is nowhere near the customer’s best interest, and putting a policy that is not in my best interest as the default option and placing the burden on me to recognize it doesn’t sit well with me.

I want a company that I trust with my data to be willing to defend itself in open court should it ever commit a violation against me that warrants legal action. A company that shies away from this principle tells me that it is not a partner to me, but rather is seeking an advantage over me in case it hurts me, making it easier for it to do so in the future.

So props for softening the blow with the opt-out, and do what you have to do, but I hope you expect the bitter taste that move will leave in customers’ mouths.

mchusma
February 20, 2014

Why do I feel this is the most meaningful update to the app since acquisition. If you make exchange support happen, you will change my life.

Brandon LeBlanc
February 20, 2014

The deadline is not included, but I’d expect it to be March 24 – the day the terms are bound.

stenbergs
February 20, 2014

Ok, I feel a little out of my depth here.
Not being a native English speaker I seem to have missed the word arbitration in class. Can someone please explain it to me and why I need to opt out? Preferably in as few sentences as possible.
As it seems to be some legal mumbo jumbo there is a good chance I wouldn’t even know the word in Swedish, which is my mother tongue. ;-)

Patrik
February 20, 2014

“Arbitration, a form of alternative dispute resolution (ADR), is a technique for the resolution of disputes outside the courts, where the parties to a dispute refer it to one or more persons (the “arbitrators”, “arbiters” or “arbitral tribunal”), by whose decision (the “award”) they agree to be bound.”
- Wikipedia.

Patrik
February 20, 2014

“Skiljenämnd” på svenska, för övrigt. https://sv.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skiljen%C3%A4mnd

Scoop0901
February 20, 2014

Encrypt before the cloud! The NSA, CIA, FBI, etc. have no right to pry without YOUR consent. Create a 400-character passphrase, store it in a secure password manager, and Encrypt before the cloud!
Use Viivo, Cloudfogger, or CryptSync.

Transparency reports be damned.

Mark
February 20, 2014

Very well said, Sean. Pretty much along the lines of my own response even if I may not have worded it as clearly ;)

Jayson
February 20, 2014
Sol
February 20, 2014

There is a deadline! The email that Dropbox sends to everyone says you have 30 days after the terms go into effect (March 24) to opt out. So, that fact’s actually conspicuously there. HOLSTEIN COW! (why are we yelling farm-animal names?)

Merovingian007
February 20, 2014

Thank you DropBox for telling us about your updated terms and conditions! For everyone here, keep in mind that local legislation where you live or work may exclude arbitration or may not prevent you from contracting your right to normal legal remedies. For example, in Ontario or Quebec arbitration clauses like the one in the new terms and conditions do not strip users of their legal rights to normal remedies (i.e. courts). Even if a user doesn’t opt out, those local laws and precedents can ensure that users can still opt to use regular courts.

SO, there are advantages to arbitration, but check your local laws and case law to check if you can have the best of both worlds.

thereader
February 20, 2014

To quote the terms of service: “Dropbox will pay all arbitration fees for claims less than $75,000. … “Dropbox will not seek its attorneys’ fees and costs in arbitration unless the arbitrator determines that your claim is frivolous.”

Marek Andreánsky
February 20, 2014

Arbitration? No, thanks :)

Markus Fritze
February 20, 2014

BTW: The Arbitration doesn’t apply to anybody in Germany. The law doesn’t allow you to give up your right to sue anybody, especially not in ToS.

arcyqwerty
February 20, 2014

Or see (one of many) articles on using encfs to encrypt with open source software! (after all, how do you know your data is actually safe if you can’t see the source!)

arcyqwerty
February 20, 2014

Yes, cryptsync is open as well but at first glance it seems to be doing copies where encfs can encrypt on demand (saves duplicating disk space)

HappyDog
February 20, 2014

I think the bigger thing in the terms is the ‘No Class Actions’ clause. It basically says that if Dropbox screw over a whole bunch of people, then you can’t do anything about it except to individually take them to court to fight each case.

To be honest, I can’t believe that is even legally enforcable, but it isn’t the kind of thing that makes me feel comfortable about a company.

Drew Decker
February 20, 2014

Account deleted

block800
February 20, 2014

Where is my lawyer? Did you get this? Where is the catch? What are you trying to do? Now, I am really getting paranoid about this paranormal Dropbox messaging activity. Pleeeease someone call me a doctor, that’s the one I need. What kind of world are we starting to live in? Just kidding… You can have my rights, the laws and your space back with it. Good luck!

David Humphreys
February 20, 2014

Dropbox, you lost all credibility of “transparency” by sneaking in an arbitration clause. Arbitration is a secret tribunal!! Same as detainees in Guantanamo. What do you have in mind for your customers? Very scary.

David Humphreys
February 20, 2014

By the way, your email says the blog provides instructions for opting out of arbitration.
WHERE? so much for transparency!

Brian C.
February 20, 2014

The most common use of arbitration agreements like these in the USA is to defeat class action litigation by making potential class representatives arbitrate their claims individually. Banks do this on a regular basis to their customers. This is, in fact, almost their sole purpose. And a recent decision by the US Supreme Court gave a green light to businesses to create and invoke these agreements, even when doing so means that individuals effectively lack any remedy.

So, Dropbox’s legal department has decided that its business practices, past, present, or future, expose it to potential liability on a class basis. Arbitration is certainly not there to help individuals get a better resolution of their claims.

I join everyone else here who urges you to opt out of this provision.

malachite2
February 20, 2014

In the US, arbitration usually does NOT help the consumer. That often happens because: (1) the cost of arbitration (pay the arbitrator) is shifted to the consumer; (2) the two main arbitration organizations –allegedly–are pro-corporate rather then pro-consumer. Those have been the allegations regarding arbitration clauses in credit card agreements. The ones the credit card issuers send out update notices periodically offering no opportunity to negotiate. Either you cancel your card or you’ve agreed to the new provisions.

That’s the brave new anti the non-wealthy/non-MNC US.

Paul
February 20, 2014

Follow the link at the end of the first bullet point in this blog post…

wsrainc
February 20, 2014

Arbitration is a guarantee of losing my business immediately. Will be sharing this “quick and efficient” way for YOU to try to immunize yourself from any sort of lawsuit with everyone I can. Uninstalled and never coming back.

Antone Johnson
February 20, 2014

People are so wacko paranoid. What are the odds you ever sue Dropbox before you die? For what? Nothing is ever worth suing over unless it’s at least $10K or so. (Small claims goes up to 7-8K.) Wish I could say I’ll live long enough to pay Dropbox $10K.

Enjoy losing out on a great product because you’re being asked to *voluntary* give up the right to fight an imaginary lawsuit. SMH.

JcGarcia
February 20, 2014

Its at the end of the paragraph above with the bold title “Arbitration”. A couple other companies I deal with were FORCING arbitration, I no longer deal with them, accounts closed, see ya! Cell phone companies, credit card companies are all pushing this so they can’t be collectively sued. Bad for business!

Fedup
February 20, 2014

One has 30 days from when the new ammendments to the ToS become effective which is March 24, 2014.

B
February 20, 2014

Privacy policy? That’s hysterical, you just spammed me and I have no idea how to stop it, you offer no unsubscribe feature. Fuck off.

NONWO
February 20, 2014

If Yahoo knows or has information about criminal activity or info that could affect national security, it is in all our best public interest to give Yahoo permission to allow “Big Brother” to have such intel. Right?? One day “Right to Privacy” will go the way of the dinosaur…extinct! “We the people” are only fighting a losing battle anyways because soon anything could be considered an RFI by the government or a matter of “national security.” Why should Yahoo compromise its billion dollar enterprise to protect the extinctual rights of a public who want to remain in private communicado. Free speech here is becoming synonymous with free information…Yahoooo!

quat
February 20, 2014

Wrong blog

desertrat
February 20, 2014

Sure you can “Opt out”. They just conveniently don’t tell you what happens if you do that……they whack your account. That may be OK, but at least they could be upfront enough to tell you that.

So the bottom line is…….agree with us or you’re gone. Nice, huh?

J
February 20, 2014

I am sorry, Dropbox, that the people commenting here lack an understanding about what they are commenting about. I read ten comments and nine of the were clearly misinformed about the law and reality.

Newsbot9
February 20, 2014

In fact, it’s of very limited application anywhere in the EU, it’s unfair in several ways (see Directive 93/13/EEC, and the precedents in EU law against allowing binding pre-dispute arbitration clauses).

(Also, in at least UK law, the amount at dispute must be more than £5000 for an arbitration clause to be valid…)

Bernie
February 20, 2014

Personally I have used Drop Box less and less these passed month as I have seen that lots of people who have nothing to do with some informations, are simply searching around as they should do something else in their time instead of spying what’s around… So if I get kicked out of Drop box… I will just Drop Dead… If one knows what that means… Take care…

AnotherOneGone
February 20, 2014

Okay maybe I just don’t want Dropbox anymore. Maybe I just happen to feel like I want to backup all my files, delete everything in my Dropbox, leave the service and never return.

James
February 20, 2014

Why is everyone so upset? Just opt-out of arbitration. It’s painless.

Bernie
February 20, 2014

See… Just to prove what I said just below… I have not finished to post my previous message, that already a unknown site named “Disqus” sent me a mail asking me to verify my e-mail within their message… This is what I call invasion… Using one system, one gets invaded by other neighborhood systems, which are not wanted, but for sure and no doubt have access to what we do, receive or have in our Drop Box… So really that P… me off, and i I work with something or someone, it’s not for calling or inviting all the the groups around… These social systems are eating really invading and not wanted… So don’t be surprised in the future if one don’t use any more systems, and simply use oneway communications… It’s more discreet…

Jacob Buck
February 20, 2014

Disqus is a commenting platform which Dropbox are using on their blog. There’s no invasion going on here :)

Philippe Doyle Gray
February 20, 2014

Congratulations Dropbox! As a trial lawyer of many, many commercial disputes over 20 years, I have read many, many agreements like these, and I can honestly say that these are some of the best written legal documents I have seen. The comments make it apparent that people understand what these documents say, even if they disagree with their contents. That is a significant achievement in itself. Speaking for myself, I think that the T&Cs are fair and reasonable. But if you hold a different opinion, at least you are properly informed to make a decision to complain or terminate the agreement. You can’t ask for more than that in a commercial relationship.

Jared Roussel
February 20, 2014

You seem to have a very odd conception of how the web functions, sir.

Jacob Buck
February 20, 2014

Can’t imagine a situation where I’d get in a lawsuit with Dropbox, and I have no reason to be as paranoid as some of these commenters, so we’re all good here.
Thanks for being upfront about the changes, and using plain English though.

Jared Roussel
February 20, 2014

I’m not so sure the free service would lose any sleep if you went back to storing your files on a hard drive. I don’t mean to be combative, but there really is no point in doing anything but either making the decision to do so or choosing to see the changes as acceptable. Anything in between is just inaction.

Jared Roussel
February 20, 2014

I didn’t read through every last bit, but from what is highlighted, these appear to be positive, protective changes for users (plus an arbitration clause that I personally opted out of). I don’t understand the fuss.

Michael Bateman
February 20, 2014

Thank you DropBox for letting me drop out of the Arbitration process but seriously, I won’t be suing you anytime soon. Please don’t sue me either. Just keep up the great work.

JOSEPH SCICLUNA
February 20, 2014

Thanks for being upfront about the changes,

desertrat
February 20, 2014

Is it painless??? Did their disclosure tell you that? Will you still have your account after the opt out decision on your part? Some commercial lawyer just posted that it was one of the best written documents he’s ever seen. That statement begs the question of how many he has seen. These eyes have seen many since 1974, and I see nothing that would lead me to believe that Dropbox is doing anything more than most corporate enterprises……..agree to arbitration in San Fran, or you’re outta here.

Spiny Norman
February 20, 2014

Did you miss the part where you should not have to opt out?

Dr. Awesome
February 21, 2014

I like your Government Data Request Principles and would like to see every website that stores client data pushing the same principles.

web consultant india
February 21, 2014

i like your Government Data Request Principles ……..God bless u all… http://www.prthamwebconsultant.com

Kirsty
February 21, 2014

Updating the terms & conditions of a service you subscribe to is not spam. They can’t do it without letting you know.

Alberto Pinilla
February 21, 2014

Good initiative but the Principles are principles. Always law is above than Principles. The solution is data encryption and Public /Private Key. Thus Dropbox complies with the law and your users enjoy real privacy.

Kirsty
February 21, 2014

Really?

Helbo15
February 21, 2014

it’s nice to hear that you have made a Government Data Request Principles that you intent to follow as long as the law permits. as a citizen from Denmark I think it is horrible to think that the US government could potentially request and gain access to all my documents. I hope that you will succeed in convincing the government to at least open up for the transparency part.
but my biggest hope is that US government will stop thinking that it has the right to All content that anyone puts out in any on-line environment.

disappointed
February 21, 2014

Dropbox becomes another commercial spy site like google or facebook … Unfortunately the web servers are not more “communication service” but carrion for governs and publicity

funkdat
February 21, 2014

one step forward and two steps back ….
this alternative medium is losing all its independance
are we gonna fight for our rights?

martesmartes
February 21, 2014

inscription can work, but I’m sure the US government would break it if they really wanted………………… they can browse my photos at their leisure – it may give them some holiday ideas for the future………………… oops they can’t go to Cuba that easily yet!

idontevenknow
February 21, 2014

Does anyone know how does the arbitration thing affect people internationally? I’m an EU citizen.
Also, a minor thing to note, I have not yet trusted Dropbox with my real name. Opting out of the arbitration means I have to.

Andreas Wennerberg
February 21, 2014

It’s the topmost and largest point in the email, the topmost and almost largest point in this announcement, and by far the largest clause in the new ToS…

angryyyyyy
February 21, 2014

Well, could you be transparent on how to unsuscribe ?

Jiannisp
February 21, 2014

Arbitration? DROP IT Before Dropbox will die!!!
Arbitration ? NO THANKS

UCS
February 21, 2014

I believe that the Dropbox services depend on Amazon’s AWS if this is still the case can the Govt. not get the data via Amazon ?

Winning
February 21, 2014

You obviously don’t understand what begging the question is.

Ormo
February 21, 2014

Arbitration? How can i full delete my account?

Damien
February 21, 2014

Encryption wont help them… they can subpoena the encryption keys. Not to mention the extra costs would prob eliminate free services.

Damien
February 21, 2014

Its sad how many people in America misunderstand the vast encroachments on their rights that corporations have them sign away every day… but hey, like you said, what are the odds you’ll need those rights anyways.

Damien
February 21, 2014

lol… only because they’re required to do it.

Damien
February 21, 2014

Odds are you are currently under 10+ arbitration agreements in other areas of your life that have the exact same terms… many in areas that you would have a much greater chance of having a claim against. It sad.

Damien
February 21, 2014

You understand that the laws of Quebec would not apply in any case since you would have to sue Dropbox here in the US right?

Luiz Fellipe Carneiro
February 21, 2014

US laws are weird.

Ben
February 21, 2014

Calling bullshit. Name one significant right that you’ve signed away to a corporation. Your paranoia doesn’t make it significant, I want facts.

Here, we’re talking a service that costs, typically, $50 a year. So if Dropbox is simply not living up to their end of the contract, at most you’re out a year’s fees because you cancel the service.

If they are, e.g. taking your private data and selling it or stalking you, that’s a criminal offense so arbitration doesn’t affect it.

Merovingian007
February 21, 2014

Yes, one would need to pursue action in the US, but because the service is being delivered in Quebec (in this case) I’m pretty sure you can ask the judge, wherever you are, to apply local Quebec law because businesses have to respect local laws when delivering services there, even if the source of those services is foreign. You can also try to have the case tried in your local jurisdiction if there are particular facts to a case that warrant it.

Sean Killeen
February 21, 2014

Hey there stenbergs. While I’m by no means a lawyer, arbitration in my understanding is where you are contractually obligated to waive your right to sue a company in open court. Instead, you are required to go to arbitration, which is where a 3rd party mediates your case outside of court. Companies do this because the legal system is complex, time consuming, and costly. However, they ALSO do it because arbitration overwhelmingly works out in the company’s favor, because the company is the one who pays the arbitrators to mediate the issue. There’s an inherent bias in such a system and it is not in the customer’s favor. Binding arbitration is often associated with stories of customers getting screwed even though a company did something terrible.

Jerimiah Bullfrog
February 21, 2014

Past history has shown that even if your business model says “We will never turn over your data”, that’s not legally binding to the US govt.

Luis
February 21, 2014

Podrían ponerlo en Español digo o no tienen gente para traducirlo gracias

Taury
February 21, 2014

Considering ending my subscription…

marc
February 21, 2014

This is the best way to spam our contacts asking them to use dropbox. Just like facebook. shame.
——-
Take contacts, for example. When you give us access to your contacts, we’ll store them so that you — and only you — can easily share your stuff, regardless of whether you’re using Dropbox on your phone, tablet, or home computer

a Client
February 21, 2014

Hi there!!!
Well, even if Dropbox is an US company, as long as it offers an international service, providing a multi-language website and mobile applications AND as you are so worried about your clients (which are all over the world), respect them and write the new “laws” in all your users language because, only a small part of them have the luck to know how to read and write in English.
I am not asking for a favor from Dropbox, assume this as an obligation over your clients, the ones how still pay your bills and allow your existence.

Even knowing a bit of english, I don’t understand the US laws (as I am European), so, is your function, not only to translate the news “lines” of your agreement but also to CLEARLY explain to your foreign clients what it means.

Dropbox, respect the ones who kept you alive for so long…. THE CLIENTS… also the ones who can bury you down as well.

Thank you..

Candida Leone
February 21, 2014

Hi guys, is the idea here that by providing an opt out from arbitration you are then going to claim (before Eu authorities at least) that the arbitration clause was not non-negotiated? I find the strategy pretty formalistic, to be honest.

Grant
February 21, 2014

Move to http://www.mega.co.nz now. Encrypted and safe

Webst
February 21, 2014

I think you’re not familiar with Public/Private key encryption.

Next ex-client
February 21, 2014

Thank you Luis… thats a real good service… so far, better than this thing called dropbox on which I have trusted my files over YEARS…. since its beginning.

Cya Dropbox… wish you the best… FY!!!

John Parker
February 21, 2014

Yep, anything of even slight importance in Dropbox is in a TrueCrypt vault.

sheda hab
February 21, 2014

Their goes our Privacy. I am busy installing my own PRIVATE CLOUD at HOME………..and then it is goodbye baby

Damien
February 21, 2014

?? Do you not know what an arbitration clause is? Right to Trial, Right to have a case heard in a public forum… both of which are removed by Arbitration agreements.

The problem is the non-criminal acts. The civil ones… the ones an American citizen would normally be able to sue for in civil court…

Pål Nilsen
February 21, 2014

And then you accidentally lose the key. Oops. You of course have your own backup somewhere else, and they don’t have to know that. ;-)

Damien
February 21, 2014

Im quite familiar with it. His comment was for Dropbox to do the encryption…. which would mean they would have the private key. Certainly if you encrypted your own work before putting it on the cloud that would be a different story. But its well known that encrypted services like encrypted email are regularly forced to provide encryption keys to investigators.

Damien
February 21, 2014

… the arbitrator that Dropbox paid….. you really dont see the problem there?

Damien
February 21, 2014

Did you miss the part where opting out actually just cancels your service? So… it isnt an actual opt out. And yes… it is mandatory. Thats the point.

jim
February 21, 2014

But there is no desktop client for uploading files. Is there?
I work in my dropbox, and I;m not wasting time uploading files through a browser.

Damien
February 21, 2014

Ask the judge to respect your local laws? lol…. thats not how procedure works. Whatever provisions Quebec has will have absolutely NO CONTROL over any case you could bring before Dropbox. But it doesnt matter whether the law will apply in the case…. BECAUSE YOU ARE FORBIDDEN FROM BRINGING THE CASE IN THE FIRST PLACE.

nemesis
February 21, 2014

“All your rights are belong to the American Arbitration Association”. I guess I should be angrier about yet more American corporate bullshit being pushed down my throat. However, I find I don’t really care in the slightest.

Why? Because Dropbox is already on life-support, and this is just a good reminder that it’s time to abandon the sinking ship and go to a service that respects your privacy. For example, Seafile ( http://seafile.com/en/product/cloud_service/ ) offers a similar service and pricing competitive with Dropbox, but on top of that, they offer a fully open source client and full client-side encryption. You read that right: “privacy policies” don’t matter, because with an encrypted service like Seafile the company is physically unable to leak your data.

On top of that, the server part of Seafile is also open source, so if you have an internet accessible computer you can host your own synchronization service and get as much space as you have on that machine. After trying Bittorrent Sync ( https://bittorrent.com/ ) and ownCloud ( http://owncloud.org/ ) I’ve at least for now settled happily for Seafile ( http://seafile.com/en/home/ ) due to their fast, performant client and full client-side encryption.

You should never trust any company to keep your private data private, so open source and client side encryption are the bare minimum one must demand from any synchronization service these days.

Alberto Pinilla
February 21, 2014

They only need public key, private key will be only on client software. Maybe Change the infrastructure and the rule of the service but i think that actually is the only way. Nowadays there are a big problem between privacity and Security. Both of them are continuosly in conflict.

Cliffo Biffo
February 21, 2014

Time to move! http://www.sync.com Encrypted, and your files stay out of the USA. Bye Dropbox!

Max
February 21, 2014

Thank you for the link!!!
Bye-bye DropBox!

Merovingian007
February 21, 2014

Hillarious. That’s all I’ve got to contribute on this one. I’m not sure if I’m right, but this is just becoming futile. I’ve opted out anyway, but you can do what you like. Peace out.

wsr
February 21, 2014

what do you mean they whack your account?

I saw this and was hoping that I could get more information about this arbitration by going here but there was no information.

Drew
February 21, 2014

Ditto.

rick summer
February 21, 2014

seriously doubt “no class actions” part will hold up in court

Diego
February 21, 2014

Does the people of Dropbox read this comments? or, even, ear theirs customers?

avinoam
February 21, 2014

Hi my dear, thanks for the udating. It’s wonderful !

Mr. X
February 21, 2014

Who can be nice and explain to me about Arbitration? Thanks

George
February 21, 2014

I guess we know who’s more important to Dropbox. And it isn’t the customer or or privacy. I’ll be moving both my personal and business accounts.

cerealspiller
February 21, 2014

Can someone explain to me the value of using a so-called open source client when 99.9% of the users use a binary provided by the service, thus have absolutely no access to the actual source? Unless you obtain a vetted version of the source, and compile it yourself, there is absolutely no guarantee you are running the same version of the code. You are still forced to trust the company providing the service to provide a binary based 100% on the published source code. Odds are, even if the company is acting in good faith, they’ve modified the open source version for any number of practical reasons. And if they cannot be trusted, well, they’ve probably absconded with your keys. And obviously, there is no way at all to validate a third-party’s claim that their service running in the cloud somewhere is based on unmodified open-source software.

Candida Leone
February 21, 2014

that I know, so far such clauses have usually been upheld by US courts.

jdennisg
February 21, 2014

It is a way that businesses can avoid courts. They use arbitrators who are paid to be the judge and jury-paid by the company. It is a good deal for the company, and a bad deal for us/you.

jdennisg
February 21, 2014

It will unless you opt out of the arbitration clause.

Candida Leone
February 21, 2014

I think it applies irrespective of whether you opt out, to be honest.

JoBangles
February 21, 2014

Stop messing around with cloud storage betas or file sharing sites hosted by fat criminals. Time to check out Tresorit. Here’s a great review! http://weestro.blogspot.com/2013/11/goodbye-dropbox-hello-tresorit.html

urbfarm
February 21, 2014

your blog is vague about government requests already received.
Can’ t you tell us if you have or not received any requests without disclosing if you have complied or not?

Domi
February 21, 2014

I won’t trust anyone until a real change in the USA law. It’s not related to terrorism and so on, it’s link to state’s economic and strategic interests.

cerealspiller
February 21, 2014

Not sure why, but Web of Trust (WOT) definitely does not care for sync’s web site.

unsure
February 21, 2014

Yeah, same here. I’m an EU citizen and unsure how this will affect me, and as far as I’m aware, Dropbox does not yet have my full name

Rembert Oldenboom
February 21, 2014

For the Dutch who don’t really understand this, please see this just posted blog (in Dutch): https://ictrecht.nl/contracten-en-algemene-voorwaarden/oh-jee-dropbox-stopt-een-arbitrageclausule-haar-terms-service/

Rae
February 21, 2014

Mandatory arbitration is a terrible idea, and I think it is shameful how you have packaged your self-serving decision to contribute to the erosion of tort rights as beneficial to the customer. The spin in this made me gag.

Welcome Google Drive
February 21, 2014

Thank you for the group email though I stopped using Dropbox after it went full and I wasn’t able to use it even by deleting.

Brianna
February 21, 2014

Arbitration prevents class action lawsuits, so potentially very bad for the consumer.

Engin Manap
February 21, 2014

The value of open sourcing the project is about commiting to users freedom. First claim is that you are not forced to use their client, you can compile it your self or use any third party software. this way you can be sure that the client is not doing anything it should not.

You are right, you can not be sure that the downloaded binary is compiled from exact same source, but if you think it is not, you are free to compile it yourself. This means if it start grabbing your screenshots or device un/plug events, you have the option to opt out, and they are accepting the possiblity of users not liking their client and using another.

The real value in here for end user is not ability to see/compile the source, it is the company’s acceptance of your right to choose.

Hector
February 21, 2014

I agree. However, people are able to sign out and everyone should take the opportunity to do this asap.

Chorizo Canario
February 21, 2014

Opino exactamente igual, para ser una lengua muy extendida, el no traducir al castellano. un mal detalle

AntiArbitration
February 21, 2014

“Nothing is ever worth suing over unless it’s at least $10K or so.”

That’s exactly the problem. Opting out of arbitration isn’t a way to lessen the costs in individual disputes because in individual cases arbitration isn’t that much cheaper than litigation.

What arbitration really does is prevent aggregating small cases into class actions. A customer illegally screwed out of $5 isn’t going to sue. They also aren’t going to arbitrate. It’s just not worth it. A million customers screwed out of $5, aggregated into a class, will sue. It might not be a huge deal for each individual customer to get back that $5, but the possibility of that kind of suit is the only thing that incentivizes companies to comply with the law.

writer on the go
February 21, 2014

Could you make it possible to edit or work on a document on drop box too than it just beeing a storage place?

Enrique
February 21, 2014

Hola, *:

Deseamos comunicarte algunas de las próximas
actualizaciones a nuestras Condiciones
del servicio y a nuestra Política
de privacidad. Estas actualizaciones entrarán en vigencia el 24 de marzo
de 2014.

Obtén más información en nuestro blog
(en inglés únicamente). Aquí se incluyen los aspectos generales:

Agregamos un apartado acerca del arbitraje a las
Condiciones del servicio actualizadas. El arbitraje es una forma rápida
y eficiente de resolver disputas y ofrece una alternativa a ciertas
opciones, como los tribunales estatales o federales donde los procesos
pueden demorar meses e incluso años. Si no deseas aceptar el arbitraje,
puedes rechazarlo a través de un formulario en línea en un plazo de
30 días posteriores a la entrada en vigencia de estas Condiciones.
Este formulario, al igual que otros detalles, está disponible en nuestro
blog.

Agregamos un apartado a la Política de privacidad en
el que se describen nuestros recientes principios para
solicitudes de datos del gobierno. También incluimos aclaraciones
que te ayudan a comprender mejor cómo nuestros servicios usarán tu
información. Por ejemplo, explicamos que, cuando nos concedes acceso a
tus contactos, los almacenaremos para que tú (únicamente) puedas llevar
a cabo ciertas acciones, como compartir archivos fácilmente,
independientemente del dispositivo que uses.

También actualizamos nuestras Condiciones del
servicio y nuestra Política de privacidad para explicar y reflejar mejor
la creciente lista de características disponibles para los clientes de
Dropbox para empresas.

Aunque simplificamos gran parte del texto,
nuestro compromiso con la seguridad y la protección de tus archivos no se ve
afectado. No venderemos tus datos personales a terceros. No ofrecemos
anuncios en función de los archivos que almacenas en nuestros servicios. Como
siempre, tus archivos te pertenecen.

Si tienes alguna consulta acerca de estas
actualizaciones, puedes obtener más información en nuestro
blog (en inglés únicamente); o bien, envíanos un mensaje a tos-questions@dropbox.com.

Gracias por usar Dropbox.

- El equipo de Dropbox

dorkin
February 21, 2014

That’s Evernote.

cr0ft
February 21, 2014

I think most users are willing to work things out without going to the courts first, but adding arbitration clauses to the TOS won’t endear you to… well… anyone.

dorkin
February 21, 2014

Same here. Cloud of my own that I can expand when needed, get to from anywhere, and secure. I’ll probably write my to Terms and Conditions so I know I won’t share my stuff with anyone else.

Harrison Salzman
February 21, 2014

Fuck. Arbitration.

Harrison Salzman
February 21, 2014

Fuck those courts.

CaptainFabulous
February 21, 2014

Bottom line: It’s an automatic “we win” if you ever have a legal dispute with them.

David Simison
February 21, 2014

The odd thing about ~adding~ and arbitration clause is that most businesses are steering away from arbitration on the advice of their general counsel. Odd that your general counsel would “buck the trend” . . . At least you made the opt out easy enough.

kosac
February 21, 2014

Fuck you NSA and Government.. bb dropbox

Joey
February 21, 2014

The attempt to impose arbitration on your customers is revolting and scummy. I am a lawyer, and know first-hand that your representations about arbitration are patently false. Arbitration is every bit as expensive and time consuming as litigation in the courts. The only difference between arbitration and litigation in the courts is that corporations virtually always win against consumers in arbitration. THAT is why you have sought to do this. Shame on you for attempting this, and for attempting to mislead your customers into believing that arbitration is in any way in their best interests.

James
February 21, 2014

Thank you for trying to take away people’s legal right to a fair trial… pigs.

I got 50 gigs free through samsung. I liked rhe service enough to buy it when time ran out.

I guess I’m glad there’s other services or there. Time to switch over to cubby.

dchi
February 21, 2014

They are able to pick where depositions, cases are held, For bigger companies like car companies this can cause a lot more hardship as they are allowed to arbitrate wherever they have “headquarters.” Imagine you are in California and having to travel to Detroit.

Julian
February 21, 2014

f. this crap too…

Lawrence Knapp
February 21, 2014

Shame on you dropbox. There is nothing more anti-american than a binding arbitration clause that requires folks to waive there right to a jury trial.

Gene
February 21, 2014

You can count me out of the arbitration clause.

Andy Delgado
February 21, 2014
John
February 21, 2014

Ok folks! Saying no to the NSA is a good thing. It would be nice if companies would not give up anybodies information to any government. However, it is probably no longer a reasonable expectation, given what people are doing on the internet that does not foster the well being of all human life. This is a good step and one that moves to protect users rights. We are all angry about what has happened. With respect to arbitration, arbitration does not take away the legal rights of due process in a court of law. It simply gives people (Dropbox and Users) a means to talk about and possible solve a problem without the encumbrances and difficulties of a full legal battle. You might compare it to coming to a verbal agreement as opposed to physically fighting over an issue with another person. Arbitration can be good. It can also be abusive. Just like the internet and it’s many tools.

Justin Beiber
February 21, 2014

I’m out. Of everything. I’m not even sure what I’m on this site for anymore, so I’m out.

PC Rose
February 21, 2014

Any contract mandating arbitration only is not worth the paper upon which it is written. Any company demanding arbitration only is one with which it is not worth dealing.

Just Charlie
February 21, 2014

Wow. A business that is so self serving that it allows this comment blog where you can trash them, their decisions and their business. Have any of you who are so against arbitration EVER been through one. I’d bet those who are so vocal here are attorneys. A asked an attorney friend of mine to write me a release that would prevent some joker from holding me responsible for their deceptive or illegal efforts. He laughed and said, “It only takes a brief, $25 and an asshole to file a lawsuit.”. Been through an arbitration, both sides paid for the arbitrator, both sides had to approve an arbitrator, both sides were allowed to educate the arbitrator as to any differences in the issues in dispute and what might normally occur in business. I bet that every case of arbitration you want to look at you will find one party claiming it was unfair and I bet you find they lost, how typical. In our case, we won, but anyone with a 4th grade education could have looked at this case and saw the fiction in this persons accounting.

You have the option to opt out, use it if arbitration bothers you. You have an issue with the NSA, don’t blame DropBox, take it up with Obama and/or vote both Repubs and Demos out of office and take back your congress. The Libertarians certainly want to help you do that very thing.

In our case, as you attorneys should know, we had to put up an affirmative defense. In our defense, we had to show the other party was responsible for their own actions and those actions damaged us. We had to show they violated the contract in force at the time. We had to spend millions to see this case through over 5 years and when this asshole lost they simply filed for bankruptcy. And we knew this was going to be the result before the lawsuit was filed.

Vote with your feet and your dollars and find a service that can provide you with the feeling of security you seek but, above all, shut the hell up. I came here to find out what I could concerning the changes in their policies, I didn’t come here to find assholes.

P1h3r1e3d13
February 21, 2014

Oh, boy, arbitration! Lucky us! Thank you so much, Dropbox!
Until today, I had the impression that you were a friendly, user-oriented little startup. You couldn’t make it clearer that you’ve now jumped over the line to evil corporation. And how sweet of you to sugar-coat that little pill, hypocrites.

Maybe try not screwing over your users instead?

Blade
February 21, 2014

Mac –> encrypted images that contain your backed up files..
Wanna see my files ? Then you have to work for it :)

Machin
February 21, 2014

There is a desktop client, only for windows atm.

cerealspiller
February 21, 2014

Yes, I agree with your points. My concern is that requiring the end-user to compile code means a trusted solution is essentially unavailable to 99.9% of the population. The problem is trust. Without some sort of independent third-party that we can trust to have the average joe’s interests at heart (and has the wherewithal to publish trusted binaries from the open source), at best we are left to pick a vendor that we hope will do no harm. Without the trusted third party, the open source discussion is only relevant to developer types. Not an easy problem to solve.

webserfer
February 21, 2014

Да ладно врать-то.

cerealspiller
February 21, 2014

Hey, could be worse. Dropbox could take Huffington Post’s lead and require you give up your Facebook account along with an active mobile number to post comments on this blog :-)

BobGilmore
February 21, 2014

Cool, I found about the Arbitration clause *and* Transporter on the same day!

Ivan
February 21, 2014

Just hope Samsung follow their users as they leave you because of this “arbitrary” change.

chuj
February 21, 2014

fuck it.
see u db……….

W. Ben Towne
February 21, 2014

Can we opt out of the new provisions nominally added for Document Previews, if we don’t like the other potential uses this legal language allows? Sure we won’t be able to use Previews then, but I don’t want or use that “feature” anyway.

cyberfarer
February 21, 2014

Have you read the ToS?

“Arbitration Procedures. The American Arbitration Association (AAA) will administer the arbitration under its Commercial Arbitration Rules and the Supplementary Procedures for Consumer Related Disputes. The arbitration will be held in the United States county where you live or work, San Francisco (CA), or any other location we agree to.”

So unless you live in SF the costs of travel for arbitration will be prohibitive. What percentage of users even live in the US?

John
February 21, 2014

I think the language in these comments are very improper, childish and not the place to or way to communicate. They should be ashame. They all most likely agreed to these changes, on many, many other sites, and in general in life. If you have a banking acount or brokage account you can’t without agreeing to such. But here again you signed without reading or understanding. Kinda like Congress and the President did with Obamacare. Welcome to the world.

Michael J Fox
February 21, 2014

Smart Man

insanelyapple
February 21, 2014

Arbitration, arbitration… Why nobody cares that they scan our documents and will probably report copyright violations and similar stuff to the respective units, by so called documents preview feature?

Josh King
February 21, 2014

Dropbox isn’t being disingenuous – their arbitration procedure IS a consumer benefit. It removes the institutional friction that keeps small-but-merited claims (which is all the vast majority of Dropbox users would ever have against the company) from being adjudicated.

Under most web TOS, you’ve got to bring a legal action (filing fees at least $100, even in small claims courts) in the company’s home jurisdiction. Those obstacles make it pointless to pursue most consumer claims.

Dropbox is now letting you do a free arbitration in your own (US) jurisdiction. You may think that the arbitrator will be biased against you (an assumption I’ve never seen empirically proven, and one that hasn’t been my personal experience in 20+ years as a lawyer), but that risk is small beer weighed against the fact that you now have an avenue to have your claim heard.

jack
February 21, 2014

cool. i’ll just stick to google drive.

JGiven
February 21, 2014

You are misreading the provision, let me decode:

The arbitration will be held in either:
1) the United State county where you live, or
2) the United State county where you work, or
3) San Francisco, CA (presumably Dropbox’s corporate HQ county), or
4) any other location that Dropbox agrees to.

So you do NOT have to go to San Francisco. If you are a foreign user, you probably will need to come to the US, but #4 gives Dropbox the option to agree to anywhere on earth where they can find an arbitrater who fits the other rules.

In my experience, this is pretty generous in terms of venue choices.

JGiven
February 21, 2014

Except in this case it appears that the venue term for arbitration is pretty broad (any county in the US where you live or work). That doesn’t mean that the arbitration itself is such a hot idea, but at least the venue issue is better than most.

JGiven
February 21, 2014

One of the interesting things about the arbitration agreement is that Dropbox is agreeing to arbitrate anywhere in the US (where you live or work), but if you decide to opt out you are agreeing to venue only in San Francisco. I am curious whether the people who are reflexively opting out are aware of this.

jc
February 21, 2014

Jajaha. Im a young researcher and from today “i used” to save everything as “back up” in my dropbox…. it seems is back to the pendrive era for me.

Eugen Mevermind
February 21, 2014

Well, as a lawyer, I have no idea what you’re talking about. Keep it up. I’m out.

Andrew
February 21, 2014

I use MEGA as well as Dropbox, and I just had a look at MEGA’s TOS and they require binding arbitration too :(

https://mega.co.nz/#terms

hartodetodo
February 21, 2014

Olvidate! me fui de esto tambien!

DBU
February 21, 2014

Why the class action waiver in the arbitration agreement? And why wasn’t that highlighted as one of the major changes? Surely that’s the reason for the change in terms… Also, the opt-out isn’t clear about exactly what terms will not apply.

DBU
February 21, 2014

Yes, but if it’s a $1 harm * 50 million users, none of those 50 million users will bother bringing an arbitration. The arbitration procedure includes a class action and class arbitration waiver. That’s what Dropbox is after, namely avoiding liability for large volume, small dollar claims. It’s their right to do so, but they should at least have highlighted this in the change of terms.

DBU
February 21, 2014

It’s not the venue provisions. It’s the class action waiver which is where the game is at.

Dawie
February 21, 2014

Dropbox days are counted. Go have fun with the NSA.

JGiven
February 21, 2014

I don’t dispute that, but that is now what the thread is about. Cyberfarer was discussing the venue, not the class-action waiver.

dyno
February 21, 2014

Try Tonido (http://www.tonido.com) and run your own personal cloud. You get to control/own your data.

Chris
February 21, 2014

Bad move, and even worse move taking us for idiots and whitewashing Mandatory Binding Arbitration as some kind of “it’s much easier, win-win!” thing.

Arbitration is anti-consumer. Period. You know it and your lawyers know it. You just apparently think we’re all stupid. Incorrect.

Zhijun Tan
February 21, 2014

I feel DropBox is leaving the users now.

John
February 21, 2014

Hubic is also a pretty decent cloud service. Works exactly the same way as dropbox on both mac and pc and 25Go for free, 10TB for 10 euros per month (they are located in France). Just using it from now on.

Alex Soriano
February 21, 2014

I hope you’re taking note of the vitriol you’re receiving over this, Dropbox. It’s a pretty crap move. http://goo.gl/uIKcRt

tannn
February 21, 2014

The bad thing about opting out is, I feel like I’m on some kind of list now that will make the service worse for me.

P G
February 21, 2014

Gov’t data request is why the cloud will never flourish.

YO
February 21, 2014

I don’t get it.

dd
February 21, 2014

like a Firefox AD. hmm

abrxas
February 21, 2014

Arbitration: It’s For Your Convenience. Trust Us. #theytakeusforsuckers

abrxas
February 21, 2014

C’mon. Arbitration is con to avoid litigation, plain and simple.

JT
February 21, 2014

Would like to see someone from europe travelling to the states for that. And no decent country would hand them over to the US

David
February 21, 2014

First dropbox stuff up and the entire system is down with people unable to access their docs across the world for 1-7 days in January 2014. Now dropbox try to avoid consumers and business users who were relying on the service from taking them to court. Wouldn’t it be better just ensuring that their servers do not crash in the first place??? Is it not reasonable that businesses and paid users should not have to wait DAYS and in some cases weeks to access their docs and should be duley compensated???Adding arbitration sends a signal that they are expecting their systems to crash again significantly in the future. Dropbox can not be relied on by business. Their communication during the outage was woefully inadequate and now they try and avoid court when they stuff up.

JGiven
February 21, 2014

What are you talking about, JT? “Hand them over”?

I think you are conflating issues, this is about the potential civil liability of Dropbox, not the criminal liability of Dropbox users.

JT
February 21, 2014

“you probably will need to come to the US”.

Or you just stay at home if u live outside the US. Thats my point.

JGiven
February 21, 2014

Yes, but the “no decent country would hand them over the us” makes it seem like you are discussing extradition, which has nothing at all to do with any of this discussion.

JT
February 21, 2014

I might have gotten the wrong idea. Is it more correct to say that roughly “if i got a beef with dropbox i need to go ovee there” rather then “dropbox got a beef with me i need to go over there”?

Wiki-Truths
February 21, 2014

Opt out of that Arbitration! If you don’t you can never sue them in court!

InPlushWeThrust
February 21, 2014

I trust Google even less than I trust Dropbox… so have fun with that.

THE KIDS LOVE IT
February 21, 2014

So the arbitrator that Dropbox is paying will be unbiased against the consumer? The arbitrator doesn’t have a personal interest in giving a judgement that’s favorable to Dropbox, so that Dropbox will choose to pay for their services again in the future?

Get real. Your post is pure bullshit; I wouldn’t expect any less coming from a corporate lawyer (let alone one who spent 5 years AT&T – look how happy their customers are with arbitration!).

JGiven
February 21, 2014

These provisions are more about the limitations on _your_ ability to sue them, not _their_ ability to sue you. If they have a beef with you, they will just shut down your account. So, for example, if you were to violate their terms of service, say by using the service to facilitate illegal distribution of copyrighted material (sharing links to copyrighted material that you don’t control), you would be hearing from the owners’ of the copyright, not from Dropbox. I am not sure how you, as a user of the service, would damage Dropbox such that a greater remedy than cutting off your account would be needed by them.

If you do have sufficient contact with some forum state in the US such that you might be subject to personal jurisdiction there, then the equation may theoretically change, but I still can’t easily imagine a scenario where Dropbox would need to assert jurisdiction over you — as a _user_ — in order to be made whole should you violate your user agreement. It just doesn’t make any financial sense.

So yes, it makes more sense to say that if you have a beef, you probably gotta come here. That probably doesn’t make any financial sense, either, in the vast majority of cases, because under your user agreement (assuming it is legal), there are very few types of damages that you can recover.

Marisa Robson
February 21, 2014

but… those docs are on your computer as well?

JT
February 21, 2014

Oh ok. My bad. I completely misunderstood the concept. Many thanks for clearing it up for me tho! Most people are not that patient and friendly

Jon
February 21, 2014

I find it quite humoring that Dropbox basically says they will continue to fight for transparency with regard to government spying, yet they will comply with the law. I understand that they will comply with the law, but when the law conflicts with their principles, which will they choose? Lavabit chose their principles. Can we trust Dropbox to do the same, or will they just tell us what makes us feel safe while crossing their fingers behind their back?

You’ve not gained any more trust in my mind. In fact, your feeble attempts to win it have only made me distrust you more. Your attempts to regain trust have no teeth.

rowenacherry
February 21, 2014

Dropbox says, “As always, your stuff is yours.” Does that mean that Dropbox is turning a blind eye to copyright infringement when “your stuff” is actually someone else’s when it comes to publication and distribution?

Stefan
February 21, 2014

Not even a class A lawsuit! Please keep that in mind and optout!

c-ya-l8r
February 21, 2014

I’m all set… preview my docs, scan them, can’t sue unless you opt out, NSA gets what they ask for without a fight. No thanks, I’ll go back to private cloud.

newbiedoodle
February 21, 2014

Technically, stuff that infringes copyright is NOT yours, so I doubt it. I think they mean that they won’t take, look at, or otherwise care about the stuff in your dropbox (Except for things that you let them do, like moving them or opening/downloading them). Unless, of course, you give them permission to do so.

scrappy coco
February 21, 2014

docs preview, arbitration…
I guess I would buy some of those “Cloud” external drives, 2 to 4 TB, encrypted …and mine.

senalb
February 21, 2014

I don’t even know what this is, or why I received it!

cerealspiller
February 21, 2014

Hey, no fair bringing up facts and stuff.

cerealspiller
February 21, 2014
Srikanth
February 21, 2014

Its is better to provide online play for mp3 files and videos and embedding facility.

JGiven
February 21, 2014

What can I say – you caught me on a good day! Best to you.

Mary B
February 21, 2014

If Dropbox is paying the arbitrators, then my best interest will never be considered. Why would the arbitrator bite the hand of the company that feeds it? Arbitration is anti-consumer, anti-employee, anti-everything but big business.

Hentai
February 21, 2014

At least Dropbox made Arbitration opt-out easy. Most companies require you to jump through hoops (really who still uses FAX) to opt out of binding Arbitration.

Danger Money Records
February 21, 2014

lol – “ObamaCare”… For the first time a US President does something to GENUINELY benefit ALL peoples of the nation (the ‘economically challenged’, in particular) and a TONNE of Americans disapproved LOL! But yeah, this issue of online companies using dubious data-gathering techniques on their users is NOTHING new so yeah, one can only EXPECT the public to voice their disapproval (as they are here {“,) @P_C_T

Danger Money Records
February 21, 2014

wow – Bluffington Post’s going H.A.M out here lol!

cyberfarer
February 21, 2014

Dropbox has 200 million users. I would bet a significant number of those are outside the US. It would represent a significant cost, and some risk, to have to travel to the US and likely have to pay for a lawyer anyway. And Dropbox saying it might, at its own pleasure, hold the arbitration where I live, offers no comfort. I’d prefer to quit Dropbox then give away most of the legal rights to my own stuff, including class actions, just by virtue of logging in.

You’re correct when you say this is Dropbox’s way of avoiding leg gal costs. But depending on the harm done, it is a shitty way. I shouldn’t have to give up my right to seek redress through the courts where there has been serious harm.

There are alternatives to Dropbox that offer greater security, are not subject to US Big Brother, and do not as ToS require I give up my legal rights. I shall be moving.

Jay Trock
February 21, 2014

So where is the opt out form?

JGiven
February 21, 2014

I don’t disagree with that. My earlier post was merely correcting your misreading of the venue provision, which doesn’t require a trip to San Francisco. Obviously, folks should vote with their feet if they don’t agree with Dropbox’s policy or contract terms.

Personally, I think it is a bit of a tempest-in-a-teapot. For what the service costs, it is a phenomenal deal and has simply incredible utility that I could not fathom doing without. When someone does it better for less, in as bullet-proof a fashion, I will consider it. Until then…

cerealspiller
February 21, 2014

See link at end of the first bullet in the blog above.

Mark
February 21, 2014

Government Agency Read my Dropbox. You are in violation of your Oath to Preserve, Protect and Defend the Constitution, not violate it. This is a felony and may be subject to imprisonment.

“Thanks George W”

At least Drop Box made us aware of it few would. Credit Due.

cyberfarer
February 21, 2014

I agree it is a tempest in a teapot and I think that’s what bugs me. Why not just say I store my data at my own risk and they accept no responsibility and no liability instead of all of this spin? You may be interested in this: http://www.techbeast.net/2013/11/03/wuala-swiss-dropbox-alternative/

Christiano
February 21, 2014

I am Italian we learn not to trust from an early age, we question everything. Yea that means the Gov./whoever, so even thinking about this…. BI FUI GUI !

dingl_
February 21, 2014

So Dropbox must comply the same as Google, Msft etc I don’t see how this addresses anything

If given a secret order Dropbox has no choice but to comply, Period. Saying you’ll resist is lying to your users and taking them for idiots

Maikol Solís
February 21, 2014

Could you please explain me exactly what does this clause mean? I’m not a legal expert and I not understand what’s happening?
Thanks

Francesco Mantovani
February 21, 2014

I trusted in you. Fuck you Dropbox

JGiven
February 21, 2014

Venue just means what court can hear the claim. The arbitration venue options (any county in the US where you live or work, or San Francisco, or anyplace else Dropbox agrees to) are broader than the litigation venue options (San Francisco only). I’m afraid I can’t offer specific legal advice as to what that might mean for you.

Kscharfenecker
February 21, 2014

Where can i get this Info in different languages, i need this Info in German that,s where i work with dropbox. To me i seem,s that everybody becomes trading companys for Information.
Wy does Nobody just ask for a Good Price and Stars Independent and Thais Carey of pure needs.

Chris
February 21, 2014

Those crying over this. Are you really gonna find your self in legal action with Dropbox? What are you storing on their servers that would require you yo go to court?

Chris
February 21, 2014

and why would you need to sue them? Have something illegal on their servers?

Chris
February 21, 2014

His post may be “bullshit” but he does have 15 upvotes..

Chris
February 21, 2014

I dont even know why people are upset. Are you really gonna find your self in court over a drop box file? What are people storing on there thats making them freak out?

whirlwindwoo
February 21, 2014

i do not know what you are talking about Dropbox, i only use you Dropbox in chat forum, then i am not a webmaster so please do not update me.

disqus_iWxmWYgfNu
February 22, 2014

不明白要表達什麼==

Mxx
February 22, 2014

Doesn’t matter. It’s a constitution right of every citizen to have a trial in a real court of law, not their paid-off biased kangaroo court.

Mxx
February 22, 2014

Yes, before punching you in the face at least they kiss you on your forehead.

Lo
February 22, 2014

Just read David.

Mxx
February 22, 2014

Stuff like DropBox’s chronic lack of security or safety.
Just search through the history of DropBox’s continual exploits and security holes.
Either they must be sued out of existence or sued to badly they have no choice but take security seriously.

bubney72
February 22, 2014

+1

Beat Diethelm
February 22, 2014

Sehr geehrte Damen bzw. Herren, warum dieser Blog nicht auf Deutsch ?
Freundlich grüsst Beat Diethelm.

Leake
February 22, 2014

Totally confused.

anand
February 22, 2014

Not working

Benni Eichert
February 22, 2014

Halten Sie uns für Idioten? Ein klares NEIN gegen ein Schiedsgericht/Arbitration.

Anita
February 22, 2014

Kan dit ook in het Nederlands?

Ricardo
February 22, 2014

Es muy bueno para mi es muy útil por mi trabajo excelente

observer
February 22, 2014

sorry dropbox, you are just massaging the words to comply with NSA and FISA laws in the USA. All foreigners which is 90+% of the world have to live with your governments need to monitor everyone. There is no privacy for individuals with any of the social networks. We need alternatives. Even cloud servers are at the mercy of governments.

Prime Remo
February 22, 2014

If you really thought that I was going to trust you Dropbox or any other of these systems, then you are mistaken. I will never ever store any document in there which might even have only my name or my family’s name on it.
Big Brother will (miss-) used it in one or the other way.
So sorry for that but it was shown in the past that trust is a none existing word for IT stuff.

Boogaloo
February 22, 2014

Despite all you paranoid weirdos pissing and moaning about these changes it seems that none of you actually took the time to read what principles Dropbox are saying they intend to adhere to in relation to government requests for your data / information …
https://www.dropbox.com/transparency/principles

Lee
February 22, 2014

Always American’s who are moaning! They live in one of the most controlling countries in the world, yet still moan. Dropbox are only doing what the US government is making them do!

Anker Steen Sørensen
February 22, 2014

No way I will continue with Dropbox.

Marco
February 22, 2014

With Boxcryptor you can continue using Dropbox and store the data encrypted: https://www.boxcryptor.com/en

Alex
February 22, 2014

You will still abuse our basic human rights and right to intimacy and privacy so you are a bad bad bad company. I apologise to all the people I recommended this software to.

Paulo Alves
February 22, 2014

You should be ashemed,is that what you scream to the whole world? Freedom,democracy,right to express yourself,etc?? I lived many years under a dictature state but nowadays my country is a REAL DEMOCRACY,you shoud learn a lot with us!

mjolah
February 22, 2014

Arbitration is rigged against consumers. It replaces impartiality with corporate hacks, eliminate the ability to use court enfoced discovery to obtain facts, and eliminates the ability to appeal. Studies show it to be nothing but legal corporate rape of it’s customers.

I’m done.

Juana Delabajo
February 22, 2014

Hi! It is very sad that Dropbox joins the bad side because so many people has join them already. Does anyone know safe alternatives?

hakkblakhaat
February 22, 2014

Wow Dropbox, you have bent over to the NSA and are now voluntarily taking it from them. I will no longer use your program.

CTJoe
February 22, 2014

I think YOU missed the part where he specifically urged opting out. His last sentence. Sorry to wake you.

Gesuto
February 22, 2014

“Updating our terms of service/privacy policy” almost always means a bad thing. This is no exception.
Goodbye Dropbox.

Noname
February 22, 2014

Too bad.

Marcel Smits
February 22, 2014

I like Dropbox and will continue to use it. I trust them to try and protect my privacy, it is their business model. That said, having to comply with the law takes precedence over my privacy. It has been like that since the phone was invented and the business of lawful interception came into being. If you have stuff that you want the authorities only to see after having extracted it from your home, that is where you should keep it. For what it is worth: arbitration is generally better than court proceedings, if you ever have a claim against Dropbox, unlike in most courts, at least you have a chance of seeing some money in your lifetime. And no, I have not been paid for this by Dropbox, this message is entirely of my own vocation.

Christopher Peter Barosky
February 22, 2014

Is every other person using Dropbox a conspiracy theorist? You all speak as if you’re going to be sent to concentration camps or convicted without trial… as if the government has time to give a shit about anything you’re wasting time whining about here.

Scott
February 22, 2014

The fact that DropBox team felt the need to develop a “Government Data Request Principles” which cites goals to fight for internet privacy is another line of evidence that the government intrusion into our life is becoming more pervasive. Thank you DropBox for fighting for personal and corporate privacy. I hope you have success.

McD
February 22, 2014

You mean ‘volition’, not ‘vocation’.

fkthegov
February 22, 2014

You are SO right!

Mike B.
February 22, 2014

For the most part, many people here are shooting the messenger. Dropbox has no choice but to comply with US laws and we lazy Americans haven’t bothered to rise up against the steady erosion of human rights perpetrated by our own government. It’s still a democracy and we could change that.
Dropbox is doing well on the matter of not abusing our contacts and other data, and trying to make the language as plain as the lawyers will allow. The arbitration thing is a total corporate grab though. However you can opt out, which is far better than MANY companies will do these days. Check your credit card agreements!

Will
February 22, 2014

Pogoplug it’s great and it’s your own cloud storage!

M. Knight
February 22, 2014

co-sign w/ Mike B.

Son_of_Taz
February 22, 2014

I’m betting that most of the “I’m leaving Dropbox” comments are from those who use the free service.

Son_of_Taz
February 22, 2014

Hey dumass, Bush hasn’t been President for five years. If you’re an Obummer supporter, take your beef to him. He could have fixed things to your liking. Instead, he stuck a knife in your back.

soh zed
February 22, 2014

That is not a good update no one should access my files even courts and police even dropbox people it should be a safe box that only me can access it like banks. This is violation of privacy and basic human rights.

Mikey
February 22, 2014

Thank DropBox for the advisory. I think congress and big government are crap in the barnyard. If one sees it, one does not have to step in it.

cerealspiller
February 22, 2014

Oh really? Even for civil matters? So if your neighbor’s dog craps in your yard, and he denies it, you have a constitutional right to a trial in a real court with a real judge?

D
February 22, 2014

hubic (25 GB for Free). 10TB, 12bucks-a-month. French service under French privacy laws.

Eth0
February 22, 2014

I smell some MegaBox comin..

Ron the DB user
February 22, 2014

Do you really think they don’t use you rmoney in a bank to make money? And when needed the authorities tend “look” at your bank accounts if they feel they need to try and track you down. Bottom line, read the TOS on everything and don’t join if you don’t like what they are offering. example: banks, credit unions, free email accounts, dropbox.

Tim Rohbock
February 22, 2014

Thank you Dropbox…you now will be my ONLY cloud service. You guys are not terrorist enablers, you are constitutionalists, keep up the good fight

mutaz
February 22, 2014

that was necessary and we will continue to use the service

Hrunga Zmuda
February 22, 2014

So, opt out like any thinking person would. Took 10 seconds.

soh zed
February 22, 2014

If you get a safe box they can’t access your box. Emails normal accounts are diffrent but this is supposed to be a safebox full of private things.

Ron the DB user
February 22, 2014

I believe so, too. Oh well! Guess they can start their own cloud and start their own internet to access it with.

rhinoselated
February 22, 2014

Shut the fuck up you statist

Julien
February 22, 2014

This type of contractual term – prohibiting class action and providing for mandatory arbitration – is illegal and null and of no effect in some jurisdictions. This is the case in Canada, in Ontario and in the Province of Quebec:

Quebec’s Consumer Protection Act, s. 11.1
http://www.canlii.org/en/qc/laws/stat/cqlr-c-p-40.1/latest/cqlr-c-p-40.1.html

Ontario’s Consumer Protection Act, s. 7(2), 8(1)
http://www.canlii.org/en/on/laws/stat/so-2002-c-30-sch-a/latest/

eMcE
February 22, 2014

Sorry Dropbox, Im out. You have one client less by your own stupidity.
You do not respect us as customers.
As my grandfather used to say.. “sayonara m*****r!
Dropbox => shift+del

not a yank!
February 22, 2014

hope you like kneeling with you ass in the air for the big govt to fuck you. your just making it easier for them to illegally get our info. thank god the laws of other countries are different. when the USA understand that we really don’t need you, youll be able to build a wall around you and shout yourself to death. then well have peace!!!

Fab
February 22, 2014

Though I won’t close my account because of the transparency of DrobBox in their communication, I will be limiting my use of DropBox to show my disagreement to the illegal actions of the government. Those who defend the government, please get connected to the government or at least educate yourself about them before you see the government in your bed. It’s ironic how Americans are kept away from deciding for their own country under the name of democracy and patriotism.

Conspiracy_Fax
February 22, 2014

If you were educated on the contents of the NDAA bill that Obama
signed into law then you would know that indefinite jail time without
trial or conviction is not only conspiracy theory, not only possible but
THE LAW OF THE LAND.

You ‘non-conspiracy’ people
are often so unaware of what is going on all around you that you protect
the conspiracies from being exposed. Ironically, the crimes would not
be able to exist if low information voters like yourself were to take an
interest in your own education. You, with your ignorance are
responsible for the conspiracies to go un apposed. So the irony is that
the very conspiracy theories that you so detest are made possible by
your ignorance.

Are you going to argue with the North
American Defense Authorization Act that is current law? Look it up or
dont comment on topic you know nothing about.

Thomas Beling
February 22, 2014

OK guys, what about a translated info? I don’t understand a word, ’cause I’m not native English.

sparky
February 22, 2014

The government is putting her nose in everything there watching everybody through the new flat screen TVs there watching everybody through the new cell phones listening to everybody’s conversations and there’s no privacy there’s no more freedom. It looks like the Looking Glass has gone into effect you know that has been into effect the last 20 years or more. Dropbox is doing a great job. This is the government warning control of everything. This is just my opinion.

alex
February 22, 2014

Just uninstall my dropbox no need to use it anymore. I really don’t want any senarios based on all of my files from anyone.

N1120A
February 22, 2014

There is nothing fast or efficient about arbitration. Arbitration is a sword to take away the right of people to fight back against large companies that injure them

W Weiser
February 22, 2014

We will continue using Drop box. Our suggestion to everyone is, ” Don’t store anything you’d be embarrassed about if your mother seen/read it”. Relax, be responsible, be on guard in all your communications and activities.

bryanleemartin
February 22, 2014

Why would one want to give up their civil right to a trial when one does not yet know the nature of the dispute? First understand the dispute then decide if arbitration or civil court is the best option.

mush
February 22, 2014

i doin´t understand

rulo
February 22, 2014

agree you can have jewels or important paper documents in a safe box, of which no one else will know of their existence

dropped box
February 22, 2014

your vague and unclear (should, could,..)statements for privacy policy are just an assurance not to use dropbox for sensitive data

Laura Andrews
February 22, 2014

I started with dropbox as a teacher four years ago – I use it mostly for my own files and occasionally share with other teachers also. I cannot remember if my account is considered home or business – how do I know? And if home version – do I have the same privacy protection explained in the new terms as “business version” I do not want my information shared, sold, or used for any advertising purposes. How can I find out? I love dropbox and don’t want to change – but want my files just as safe as all other dropbox users.

Toyin
February 22, 2014

Maybe it’s time for Dropbox to consider cloud encryption, local decryption of user files.

Mxx
February 22, 2014

If there was some law broken, then yes.

mjolah
February 22, 2014

So you accuse me of not being a “thinking person”? Actually, you are the one with the cognitive impairment (look it up) – as my post was quite clear – I will NOT in any way support the continued erosion of protections of indivduals by corporate America – and that means NOT SUPPORTING THEM (get it????) either through the continuation of my PAID service, or even the free version. There are alternatives, and I vote with my dollars as well as my presence.

By the way, the “opt out” is only temporary….

Mxx
February 22, 2014

Binding arbitration is often associated with stories of customers getting screwed even though a company did something terrible.

http://consumerist.com/2013/08/22/comcast-lawsuit-shows-why-mandatory-binding-arbitration-is-just-plain-evil/

MissCommunicate
February 22, 2014

Pogoplug? It says Japan, but also San Francisco CA. I don’t know nada of specific USA law except for NSA spying on the entire world You think using Hubic under Fr law makes a difference? Actually, I don’t think It’s ‘save’ where ever,for France is just as nazi as America. And don’t exclude Holland EU, it’s very similar to the USA’s violation of privacy and human rights. What’s going on in this world. I have a bad feeling……

Mxx
February 22, 2014

And you will never know if you are. :/

Mxx
February 22, 2014

To be honest, I can’t believe that is even legally enforcable, but it
isn’t the kind of thing that makes me feel comfortable about a company.

Well, you can thank AT&T for making sure that it is legally enforcable. :/ see http://consumerist.com/2011/04/27/supreme-court-rules-that-companies-can-block-customers-class-action-suits/

Mxx
February 22, 2014

You can see an incomplete list here https://www.citizen.org/rigged-justice-rogues-gallery

Mxx
February 22, 2014

If it was legal and they could make money on it, they would murder your whole family for an extra $10/month…even if it was simply ethically wrong.

misscommunicate
February 22, 2014

OMG, I get the Hubic page in Dutch! So, there goes your privacy. Dutch law is as bad as American. More suggestions?

Milli
February 22, 2014

I will appreciate if a step by step use of Dropbox for I totally forgot after opening it. I don’t even remember password if any. Please star me off afresh.

TheLonelySandPerson
February 22, 2014

What… what is this? A simple, plain-english rundown of TOS changes? MADNESS!

Seriously, thank you so, so much for this. I hate getting notifications that TOS has changed, but no clue as to where to look for the differences.

Damien
February 22, 2014

So… just dont upload it to the cloud then. Or setup your own server. If you put data onto a 3rd party service, your information is no longer “private” because you cannot have an expectation of privacy when you give your information to another.

Damien
February 22, 2014

Except… its not a true opt-out. If you opt-out, they discontinue your service. In effect, arbitration is mandatory.

Damien
February 22, 2014

Im not sure how you could ever come to the conclusion that arbitration is better than a court system… You will not see any money in arbitration. The judge is hired by DropBox…to rule for dropbox. Thats the point.

Either way, even if you were awarded money in an arbitration, the judgment received is equivalent to a court judgment and thus acquiring the money or getting dropbox to actually pay is going to be the same. The only difference is that your claim is not public and the person ruling on your case is being paid directly by Dropbox.

Icloud
February 22, 2014

What….. I don’t understand ,customer is always right,but how could you do that,
Hope you will clean up soon….

Hrunga Zmuda
February 22, 2014

Sorry if you thought I accused you of not thinking. I could have worded that better. But where does it say it is temporary? I went to the page to opt out and it said no such thing. If it comes out again I’ll deal with it then. Too many apps and too much dat in Dropbox, plus lots of free space from sharing with a few friends. I’ll give it up when I have no choice. No doubt not everyone at DropBox is as evil as their attorneys.

Andrea F
February 22, 2014

You can copy, paste and traslate whit google translator…(sorry for my poor poor english!)

SuZi Q
February 22, 2014

Why is everyone on here talking about the USA? We have more freedom here than many many countries regarding IT & online stuff (among other freedoms) that it seems everyone on here partakes of so if you don’t like the USA’s policy then go with a dropbox company in your own country!! (which you OBVIOUSLY cant do!) & of you are FROM OR LIVING in the USA & don’t like it..LEAVE..DAMN!

Ezzoubeir Jabrane
February 22, 2014

the regular version is the free service …

浩洋 花光
February 22, 2014

I can understand a little. But I agree!

juan bautista
February 22, 2014

Thanks Dropbox team, see you..!!

浩洋 花光
February 22, 2014

I can understand a little. But I agree!

maria cecilia frias
February 22, 2014

Ok, thanks for the information.

AlainD
February 22, 2014

Dear DropBox Team,

Thanks a lot for this comforting and informative update.
That you don’t sell our personal data and others in good to know, however I would have been pleased to read ‘sell/share’ instead of ‘sell’ alone!… See what I mean??!!……..

Best regards anyway and thanks for the service!

AlainD

KC Masterpeice
February 22, 2014

I love how you describe arbitration as quick and efficient. It is: for the company! but it is inherently anti-consumer. Thank you pro big business Supreme Court! Bend over America! And shame on you drop box.

KC Masterpeice
February 22, 2014

Did you miss the Supreme Court decision on this? All companies will be adding this language because it makes us unable to punish them. Arbitration ends with a pro business decision in over 80% of cases and it prevents class action suits.

Cami Yañez
February 22, 2014

donde puedo poner que rechazo el nuevo acuerdo?

Caspin
February 22, 2014

I know it’s not Dropbox’s fault that the totalitarian American government is bullshit, but I’m going to delete Dropbox anyway, and go with Hubic, which has 25 gigabytes of free storage and has its servers on French soil, in a nation that actually respects its citizens’ privacy. That nation doesn’t fall under George W. Bush’s Patriot Act, and therefore they have us beat in this category. The US Gov is making sure that all cloud business is done overseas and the United States is left out in the cold, in a sort of indirect sanctions.

Nanny
February 22, 2014

Please uninstall my dropbox no need to use it anymore. I totally forgot after opening it. I don’t even remember password if any. I haven’t a clue how to use dropbox. Thank you anyway

Gwen Boucher
February 22, 2014

I used Dropbox once and it did not work out. Where is the form to cancel it.

Роман Комиссаров
February 22, 2014

Did you mean “can not understand”

dapp23
February 22, 2014

Amen!

Saeid Nouri Neshat
February 22, 2014

Is there any service with more privacy other than dropbox?

ADorta
February 22, 2014

I want to discontinue your services,
Thank you
ADorta.

DWC
February 22, 2014

Arbitration? Ab-so-lutely NOT.

Our US Court system was included in the US Constitution (Article III). If our US Constitution is not good enough for Dropbox, then Dropbox is not good enough for me. Dropbox can go drop.

Styret
February 22, 2014

Thanks for a great service!

AlPal
February 22, 2014

I love Dropbox, good to see an honest attempt to keep the customer up to date and protected! I use your service for all my storage needs and have shared with many.

By the way…. why the assumption that Dropbox (+61) is in the USA? It is probably subject to all governments around the world’s policies… certainly not just the USA Gov. Just like adobe, Microsoft etc

Good work DB, thank you

mike
February 22, 2014

am switching to mega everybody should do so :)

alex
February 22, 2014

How about adding timelines in dropbox just 15time so that we also can discuss work in dropbox

eric
February 22, 2014

Only reason to add an arbitration clause is to tack a CLASS-ACTION WAIVER to it, and of course, there is one in the new terms.

Haris Hashim
February 22, 2014

Anyone from DropBox, I just need to understand impact to non us citizen before opting out of arbitration.

Looks like a lot of commenter here already decide not to use DropBox for sensitive data. Some are closing their account.

Just need to understand thing before taking any action.

thomas
February 22, 2014

Yes, try Owncloud! I installed it on my NAS at home. great!
Never store private data in the US.
Bye Dropbox

Shawn Kelly
February 22, 2014

I would never store “sensitive” files in any cloud. If the NSA wants to know what’s there they’ll just look. NSA, FBI, CIA and Oblamer can go fuck a goat anyway.

Anton111111
February 22, 2014

please, stop spam from dropbox. I have already understood you new rules! But why you send me this email 10 times!

Mr. Dogshit
February 23, 2014

TOS, yep it just seems to be just that, the appropriately named Toss. Who gives a shit about what the Mercan government see? If you don’t want them to see something, why on earth display it on tinterweb? I find DB quite useful for moving photos around, from phone to pc to laptop to other phone to the Olds abroad.

Xxxxx
February 23, 2014

Until it affects YOUR biz. Then you’ll sing a different tune.

Ms WitchyLady
February 23, 2014

As an Australian Citizen with nothing to hide anyway. Why should I worry about Arbitration rules in the US? Also most people know that Google saves everyone’s data for at least 2 years. So if any Government or Police need to access anyone’s information they can via Google.
Unless some of you out there really have somethinf to hide that is of national importance? Why worry about all this Dropbox stuff?
Just my humble opinion & I think Dropbox is great & will continue to use it to save all my photos and various documents too.

Stergios
February 23, 2014

Going with Hubic…..

aaronj2906
February 23, 2014

Found another provider anyway. My own NAS. Dropbox is now relegated to the dust-bin of the past… You were worth exactly what I paid for you as an experiment in cloud storage. Nothing.
Storing sensitive data on any ‘cloud’ is asking for trouble, and that will ultimately kill your company. Don’t let the screen door hit-ya on the way out…

henry
February 23, 2014

You guys are awesome Dropbox team, I use your app a lot for my job and so business. Don’t mind rude people. Keep the free version and good luck. I love you he he he

Bashar3A
February 23, 2014

Having business sensitive data that you can’t put on the cloud is understandable. However not everything is that critical, so to say they are part of the past is not accurate at all. In fact cloud storage is getting more and more popular.

I have 10 TB NAS for home usage, let alone business. So i’m well aware of it’s benefits. But what if it catches fire? Do you have another off site backup?

Dona Ferentes
February 23, 2014

This is just the usual lie, telling consumers that something is ‘better’ for them, when it’s actually better for the company and considerably WORSE for them. Shame on you.

Cla
February 23, 2014

Jajaja, yo tampoco!

Vassia Karabelias
February 23, 2014

Je n’ai jamais
demandé ni choisi Dropbox. Et je vous demande dans tous les cas de
cesser a m’envoyer des messages. Je n’ ai PAS du tout besoin de vos
services.

Merci.
Vassia Karabelias

dam
February 23, 2014

good

Клото
February 23, 2014

Little that is clear from this lengthy message. I need advice Snowden.

JHSS111
February 23, 2014

Please, never put an end to the free version.

Kayvan
February 23, 2014

I love dropbox

Danton
February 23, 2014

Just best to avoid any US owned services no matter where the server claim to be.

PhilipCabibi
February 23, 2014

Require a warrant or I will find a foreign cloud service.

PhilipCabibi
February 23, 2014

I hate the “if you have nothing to hide then you have nothing to fear” argument. If I have nothing to hide then who crowned you with the right to search me and go through my stuff?

dav
February 23, 2014

What in case you opt out???

crowley
February 23, 2014

fuck you dropbox. it is not privacy. u are sucking dick of U.S.A /NSA

Androgynous Adopter
February 23, 2014

You sound just a tad self important and with toouch idle time on your hands. One will ever want to go through all your boring “stuff” in any place!

Khürt L. Williams
February 23, 2014

“..not everything is that critical”. You don’t get to make that determination for others. For me, every piece of data I create is critical. I hate this shit where someone thinks they can tell me what is and is not important in my life.

@aaronj2906:disqus, I will also be building my own cloud services.

As they say on the web all the time, “if you don’t like the TOS, then delete your account and don’t use”. I’m taking the advice.

Khürt L. Williams
February 23, 2014

Why do some people, like you, assume to know what is right for others?

PhilipCabibi
February 23, 2014

It’s a Sunday and yes I’d rather discuss issues than go to church. Apparently so do you. And you never know when someone wants to. Someone could accuse you of something false… but instead of gathering more evidence… agents here can just write off subpoenas by themselves with no judicial oversight. Hell.. even the judicial oversight that does exist is conducted through Secret and outdated FISA courts. It’s not that I’m important. .. it’s privacy as a whole that should be important to everyone. Therefore I won’t use a service that breaks the law by complying with illegal subpoenas which run contrary to human rights in international law. Nobody should

Regina
February 23, 2014

I love Dropbox!

Bill
February 23, 2014

Khurt, I cannot agree with you enough. You have hit the issue at its core – people telling other people what to value, and how much to value it. Bashar, you do not have to value other people’s data, but you have no right to tell me what is important to me and what is not. You might not value (or think I should value) every one of a hundred pictures of my son on his first birthday, but I consider that every bit as vital as my tax returns.

EDIT: Have you looked at OwnCloud?

Bill
February 23, 2014

For me it is not the question of whether I have something to hide, which in my case I do not, but whether or not the government is going to fish through my shit anyway. I have no fear of something being “found”, but I do fear a world without privacy. It’s my shit and not yours. Plain and simple. You are being very disrespectful by calling someone’s data boring for no reason.

Vishal Chaudhry
February 23, 2014

When you suggested that, you yourself made an assumption with an indication. What’s the point?

Kike
February 23, 2014

Thanks Dropbox team !

Khürt L. Williams
February 23, 2014

Because Ms WitchyLady wrote:

“Unless some of you out there really have somethinf to hide that is of national importance? Why worry about all this Dropbox stuff?”

Gilles Ragheboom
February 23, 2014

I’m french and I’m curious to know what your government will do with my information.
(France is a european country, near England… I know 93% of american people don’t have passport, that’s why I explain lol)

Bill
February 23, 2014

I have no idea what you mean by “up to date and protected” as these changes do not accomplish that. My “approval” of the new ToS is neither here nor there but I must point out you are speaking rather highly about an updated ToS…

Dropbox HQ is in SF, Cali but I do not disagree they are subject to a variety of different government laws because of the countries their user base hails from.

Bill
February 23, 2014

Arbitration is how all the fucking cellular carriers force contracts down your throat. Even with demonstrable evidence against them you cannot go to court. Terrible!

Khürt L. Williams
February 23, 2014

Who gave you the right to decide that his stuff is boring? That’s exactly the issue here. Someone deciding for someone else.

Vishal Chaudhry
February 23, 2014

I am not going to argue, I myself have an hubic account. But if you read more about them, they say they have undisclosed regions of operations and 3 data centers. Bottom line sensitive data and cloud storage never go together.

Khürt L. Williams
February 23, 2014

Yes, I am considering deploying ownCloud on my Raspberry Pi.

http://www.instructables.com/id/Raspberry-Pi-Owncloud-dropbox-clone

Vishal Chaudhry
February 23, 2014

The entire world knows that 99.9% of French are arrogant, lazy and retards. Whats your point?

anonymous
February 23, 2014

How does this affect overseas users? I’m not a us citizen!

anonymous
February 23, 2014

Another legitimate question, replied to by an American with stereotypical ideas! Just answer the question!

Vishal Chaudhry
February 23, 2014

Realistically if you use whatsapp, Facebook, google, it doesn’t. Govt knows all there is to know about you.

Vishal Chaudhry
February 23, 2014

What is the question, was my first point.

Indian
February 23, 2014

See who is barking! An Indian ass hole.

Vishal Chaudhry
February 23, 2014

Lmao. I just checked your country!

scotty
February 23, 2014

I do have to agree, most government labels should start of with TOS S , Have been using dropbox now for a couple of years and its brilliant, mainly used for my holiday snaps and hey presto when am home from my vacation, there they are already on my pc, please keep the free version, and do away with this government shite… thanks dropbox

Gilles Ragheboom
February 23, 2014

The entire world knows that americans thinks “We”re the kings of the world”, but don’t know the world, except bye TV… I went 2 times in USA, I know very well Brasil, Asia, South Africa, Australia… And you? Hospital is free for everyone in France and if we need to take a plane to go to the best hospital, it’s still free… And you in USA? I mean for POOR people… Really? And you treat me like an arrogant? And Lazy? What do you know about me. I’m living in a french island in Indian Ocean and if someone from Madagascar arrive to hospital, he will be treat like a french and urgent treatment will be free… Do you do the same with mexican people for exemple?…. Pffff you just repeat what you heard at TV

Raymond
February 23, 2014

Your phone phone conversation are being recorded and your phone is being use to get your gps location. Now your personal pix and video about you kids life and memories are going to be seen by some one you don’t know and posible change the video or pix with and edited versión that can screw you big time. If the government can get that information that means your employers can get that too and it is matter of time before your precious family memory end up on ccn or local news or a show that makes fun of this. America is not longer the land off the free and privacy all you information is public notice. It suck because just want to back you my kids pix and those sweet moments about my family in case that you loose your phone or you computer get hit with a virus. Please keep free Dropbox version. And the US government needs to stop and being charged with human rights and oppression. Is this country is a democracy better start to listen to his citizens and behaves as a democracy. But people you also need to understand that there is child pornography out there and terrorist because of this people the rest of us are being thrown under the bus by loosing our right and privacy. USA is not more usa.

anonymous
February 23, 2014

The question is – what would the us government do with the information?

Ed
February 23, 2014

Concerning arbitration, you don’t need to worry about it, unless Dropbox screws you over at some point. It is a reasonable alternative to suit that usually allows for an equitable remedy. But it also occurs behind closed doors so any wrongs likely cannot be made public. It’s a way for you to be compensated, but for no one to know that dropbox did anything wrong. Also there is some controversy over whether it is equitable, because dropbox will likely be the one in charge of hiring the arbiter (the judge in a sense).

Opting out of the arbitration agreement, however, does not preclude the use of arbitration if a claim does arise and you decide that arbitration would be a better remedy. It is definitely cheaper than going to court.

There are other ways that dropbox can cause you harm than just problems with privacy and the government. I would recommend opting out.

Ed
February 23, 2014

I think they just meant that maybe dropbox is useful for somethings and not for others. Some of us don’t really care if the government can under certain circumstances access our family photos. Others may care. They shouldn’t use dropbox then.

Side note, the role of government has for all of time justified the necessary invasion of privacy. Society involves the secession of certain rights to the government’s authority to protect other rights determined to be more valuable. There is nothing wrong with the government having a right to our online content. It’s a matter of degree, and some people may prefer less access at the risk of giving up some protections. But everyone’s preferences are necessarily different and the majority have at least acquiesced to this particular (limited I might add, there is a process the government must go through) invasion of privacy to allow the government to protect other rights. There will always be some people whose preferences are not met.

Raymond
February 23, 2014

That includes social sites and email. May say something and some one can miss understood you and then all hell brake loose and go on national TV and you are public enemy number 1. After a while it proven that you are not the enemy and that some one just miss understood you. Legal you be ok and free, but you would always bet that public enemy 1 to the people eyes. Reputation is down the drain and will always be there. That is for the people that don’t have nothing to hide. I have seen this on many roll model citizens and got them life ruin and them family broken a part do to information manipulation and ears dropping on the middle or the end of the conversation. This is real life for you.

BENDER
February 23, 2014

I hate when somebody rummaging in my private life! They’re all perverts! The national security is just a cover! They are only pervert jerks!
Is there any statics about how many “evil-terrorist” have been busted with this indiscrete laws? I have a guess…

I hate google drive and the microsoft cloud, because they’re all spy-agents.. and now DB falls into this shit too. I’m so sad…

Unfortunately I have to use the cloud technology, but I will try to avoid it as much as I can in the future.
What will happen if I opt-out?

Christopher Peter Barosky
February 23, 2014

I will certainly look into this and agree wholeheartedly that everyone should be as educated as possible, not excusing my own lapses in knowledge about ever-evolving policy. You’re missing the bigger picture though of the reality that the government does not care about you. Like at all. Maybe that makes you sad?

Khürt L. Williams
February 23, 2014

He has a point. Too many Americans are ignorant of geography and history. I’m American.

tony
February 23, 2014

What is this world comings too, nothing is privet anymore so why bother. Iv nothing to hide so it dont bother me.

Ara K
February 23, 2014

I’m confused. I thought your storage encryption algorithms prevented anyone, including Dropbox staff, from accessing users’ data. Am I wrong?

Syed F. Hassan
February 23, 2014

Government Data Request Principles “THIS LINK DOES NOT EVEN LOAD”

Brianm
February 23, 2014

Why do online opportunities to comment attract so many people who quickly drag the conversation totally off-track and downhill? Dropbox has to comply with certain policies of the government. If you don’t like it, contact your representative and vote. While I don’t appreciate the snotty, superior remark about Americans and passports, I am revolted by the disgusting insults hurled at our old friends the French and Indians! If you can’t drag your mind and mouth out of the racist gutter, drag yourself into a deep hole somewhere and let the rest of us talk like educated adults!

Also, weigh the information and stop the paranoia. So you want Dropbox to become a safe haven for terrorists, criminals, and child pornographers? You like cybercrime?